Rimfire

So called because the firing mechanism of the rifle strikes the rim of cartridge as opposed to the centre of it, rimfire shooting involves the firing of live .22 calibre ammunition.

Prone shooting  involves shooting at targets from a position lying on one’s stomach. Rifles are single shot .22 calibre and, in a right handed person are supported by the right shoulder and the left hand. The shooter wears a rigid jacket made from canvas and/or leather and the rifle is further supported by the use of a sling which goes round the left upper arm, round the back of the left wrist and then attaches to a handstop on the forestock of the rifle.

The sights used are diopter sights with a “pin hole” on the rear sight by the eye and a circle on the end of the barrel. The targets have a black centre circle which the shooter attempts to get in the centre of the foresight, with a perfect white ring around it before pulling the trigger and hopefully taking out the pip in the middle of the bull….or at least that’s the theory.

Carbine shooting, otherwise known as Lightweight Sporting Rifle is the rimfire equivalent of sporting air rifle. It is great fun and relatively inexpensive, using cheaper rifles and ammunition.

It uses short barrelled, often semi automatic, rifles fired from a standing position at a larger target, at distance of 20 yards. Carbines generally are far less sophisticated than match rifles and use of rigid jackets and slings is not permitted making the shooters level of skill more of a factor.

Benchresting involves sitting at a bench with the front of the rifle supported on a rest and the butt supported in the shoulder. It is normally shot with telescopic sights at either 25 yards indoors or 50 yards outdoors. Either rimfire or air rifles can be used  at 25 yards but at 50 yards bullets are really required.

Some shooters regard bench resting as a soft option to match shooting but in fact it requires just as much skill. The targets are very small, in some events the 10 ring at 25 and 50 yards is just 2mm in diameter, so it is very much the ultimate in precision shooting requiring very good breath and trigger control.

KTS is one of the few clubs in the Yorkshire area that has it’s own 100 yard outdoor range so is an excellent place for those who wish to move on to compete at a high level.

At 50 metres prone shooting is one of the Olympic shooting disciplines and a decided by 60 shots fired at electronic targets within an 75 minute period. Most competitions at club and regional level are shot over a number of months with 1, 2 or 4 cards needing to be shot every 2 to 4 weeks and as such prove to be a very good measure of consistency.

Shooting really is all about consistency. Every one has good nights and flashes of brilliance, but the real challenge is to hit the middle time after time. Most competitions tend to be shot in classification groups from A to D, with elite shooters being invited to join X class. An X class shooter will have an average of at least 98.6%, where as D class is normally up to 94% which might not sound like a big difference until you have completed 60 shots and find yourself over 20 points behind.

50 & 100 yard ranges

The Rimfire section is very active with teams and individuals competing at local, regional and national level plus a wealth of experience and coaching for those who are completely new to the sport.